Egypt’s Transition Emboldens Brotherhood

Much of the idealism and the promise of unity that emerged from the massive populist uprising that captivated Egypt and swept longtime President Hosni Mubarak from power in February seems to have been lost.
In the three months since, the Muslim Brotherhood – an Islamist movement that was banned under the previous regime – has grown more confident and has shed layers of its past façade, as it prepares for Egypt’s important parliamentary elections in September. Read more of this post

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The Syrian Muslim Brotherhood

As Syrian President Bashar Assad grows more and more isolated, his regime’s arch-nemesis – the Muslim Brotherhood (al-Ikhwan al-Muslimun) – is gearing for a comeback. Fortunately for the brotherhood, powerful politicians in Lebanon are ready to lend a helping hand against their former patron.

Background

Although nominally a branch of the eponymous movement founded by Hassan al-Banna in 1920s Egypt, the Syrian Muslim Brotherhood is a creature of the socio-economic, cultural, and political setting in which it evolved. Whereas Banna was a man of modest means who rose up to challenge post-colonial Egyptian elites, Read more of this post